Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Solitude -Peaceful Contemporary Impressionist Landscape/Seascape

SOLD at the Old Lyme Junior Women's Club Expressions 2008 Benefit Art Show

Solitude
Solitude, painting by Jan Blencowe

About This Painting:
Media: acrylic
Size: 20 in X 20 in (50.8 cm X 50.8 cm)

I've spent at least 2 weeks varnishing, framing and carting paintings around to galleries! Now it is time to get back to blogging and then to a regular painting schedule. This is yesterdays effort, and believe it or not you get out of shape when you stop for a couple of weeks, same as with exercising. I was exhausted after I finished this! LOL I did have a good time though using sea sponges as part of the painting process, and exploring some other acrylic painting techniques like scraping back layers. I still have some larger canvases to prepare for painting and use and then I think I will switch back to some smaller pieces. Stay tuned!

5 comments:

Jo Castillo said...

Hi Jan, I'm really enjoying your acrylic paintings. What do you mean, "scraping back layers"? I haven't been painting them too long.

Thanks.

JWP said...

I really enjoyed your work. Thank you for sharing it.

Jan Blencowe said...

jwp...Thanks for visiting, glad you're enjoying the paintings.

Jan Blencowe said...

Hi Jo,

If you're using the acrylic paint thicker like oils, rather than thinner like watercolors you can use this technique. I usually tone my surface or underpaint with a warm color and then throw down an isolation coat. Then I begin painting as usual, sometimes I want to scrape away some of the paint to reveal the underpainting or the color of the toned board. With oils you would just use a rag and maybe some turps but with acrylic the paint has usually begun to set up and is tacky so you have to take a palette knife or a really stiff scrubby brush to scrape off some layers of paint. Along with revealing the color underneath, this leaves the surface uneven, which I tend to like becasue acrylics can level out and get too flat for my tatse so the scraping back creates surface texture that can look similar to brushstrokes from oil paint. Hope that helps.

Sandpiper said...

I was looking for Connecticut blogs and came across yours. I really like your style of painting. There is a nice mood to your work.